1359714445 <![CDATA[Blog]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php en hickoff@comcast.net Copyright 2013 2013-02-01T11:26:24+00:00 <![CDATA[Big Delta Waterfowl News]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/big_delta_waterfowl_news http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/big_delta_waterfowl_news#When:11:26:24Z
Dr. Frank Rohwer
Nick Pinizzotto
Delta Waterfowl is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Frank Rohwer as president and Nick Pinizzotto as chief executive officer. The changes are effective immediately.

Rohwer took on the role of interim president last October. His confirmation as president is the latest step in a long association with Delta.

Rohwer started working at Delta as a student assistant in 1976, and continued as a funded Delta graduate student for both his master's degree and doctorate work. After a short hiatus in the late 1980s, Rohwer returned to Delta as the scientific director in 1991. He has held that position for most of the years since then, while simultaneously serving on the faculty at Louisiana State University.

"These are exciting times," Rohwer said. "I'm confident Delta will become even more effective as a science-based advocacy organization. We are in this for the ducks, the hunters, the habitat and the waterfowl heritage that we love."

Pinizzotto, who joined Delta last year as chief operating officer, takes on an expanded role as chief executive officer.

Pinizzotto is an avid outdoorsman and committed conservationist who spent the past 15 years developing and managing several highly successful conservation programs.

Prior to joining Delta, he was associate vice president of the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy overseeing the organization's award-winning watershed and conservation services initiatives.

"This is really the start of a new day for Delta," says Pinizzotto. "It's the key to the re-assumption of growth and increased mission success for this venerable organization. Frank and I are committed to moving Delta forward with the help of staff and our fabulous volunteers and supporters."

Charlie Hager, newly appointed chair of Delta's board of directors, says the new leadership structure will better position the foundation for future growth.

"Nick's business, process and accountability skills, and his range of experiences honed in leadership roles at other organizations will bring a fresh and objective set of views that will be vital to Delta's success," says Hager. "Frank's role is to be the outward facing projection of Delta. He will provide vision forward while simultaneously reflecting Delta's long history as a research organization that will always be grounded by our commitment to science."

Delta Waterfowl Foundation is a leading North American conservation organization, tracing its origins to the birth of the wildlife conservation movement in 1911. The Foundation supports research, provides leadership and offers science-based solutions to efficiently conserve waterfowl and secure the future of waterfowl hunting. Delta Waterfowl is based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Bismarck, N.D.
Contact:
Nigel Simms
Vice President, Communications
Delta Waterfowl Foundation
nsimms@deltawaterfowl.org
O: 877.667.5656
C: 204.294.0374
]]>
2013-02-01T11:26:24+00:00
<![CDATA[Ducks Unlimited Supports LCRA Wetlands Move]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/ducks_unlimited_supports_lcra_wetlands_move http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/ducks_unlimited_supports_lcra_wetlands_move#When:12:41:56Z
A cadre of migratory birds depends on the managed wetlands provided by rice agriculture.
AUSTIN, Texas - Ducks Unlimited strongly supports the Lower Colorado River Authority's (LCRA) unanimous decision to move forward on the development of an off-channel reservoir to provide water in the lower basin for rice farming and wetlands management. DU represents the interests of waterfowl, other wetland-dependent wildlife and waterfowl hunters with respect to Texas water issues.

"Approval of off-channel reservoirs is critical to planning and providing water in the lower basin for rice agriculture and other managed wetlands during extended dry periods, and it's a crucial step in ensuring sufficient water supplies for all users. Having the capacity to store more water downstream will reduce demands on upstream supplies," said DU Conservation Outreach Biologist Kirby Brown.

As planned, the reservoir at Lane City, Texas, will provide 90,000 acre-feet of water for irrigation. This water, captured from local rains and river overflows, would be available even during the drought of record. In addition, LCRA approved the pursuit of 10,000 acre-feet of groundwater at a site in Bastrop, Texas, to meet the board's recent goal of 100,000 additional acre-feet in the lower basin.

Waterfowl and other migratory birds depend on the rice prairie wetlands complex for survival. Approximately 60 percent of the estimated 1.96-million-bird midwinter waterfowl population for the Texas Mid-Coast is expected to rely on ricelands (active and idle flooded rice fields) to meet their food needs. In addition, the Gulf Coast Joint Venture identifies specific population objectives for more than 12 million shorebirds and wading birds that are highly dependent on water in ricelands for nesting, migration and wintering habitat.

"DU thanks the LCRA board and staff for moving forward on the approval and looks forward to quickly getting the project on the ground," Brown said. "In addition to rice agriculture's tremendous role in the Mid-Texas Coast's economy, the importance of ricelands to waterfowl and other migratory birds cannot be overstated."

For every 10,000 acres of flooded ricelands lost, the region loses the ability to support 120,000 waterfowl. Thus, the loss of LCRA water for rice fields on more than 50,000 acres in 2012 impacted 600,000 ducks, as well as additional wetland-dependent shorebirds and wading birds.

"The proposed off-channel reservoirs do benefit all users," Brown said. "Therefore, we hope there will be widespread support to secure funding for their construction."

Ducks Unlimited Inc. is the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to conserving North America's continually disappearing waterfowl habitats. Established in 1937, Ducks Unlimited has conserved nearly 13 million acres thanks to contributions from more than a million supporters across the continent. Guided by science and dedicated to program efficiency, DU works toward the vision of wetlands sufficient to fill the skies with waterfowl today, tomorrow and forever. For more information on our work, visit www.ducks.org. Connect with us on our Facebook page at facebook.com/DucksUnlimited, follow our tweets at twitter.com/DucksUnlimited and watch DU videos at youtube.com/DucksUnlimitedInc.
Contact:
Andi Cooper
601-956-1936
acooper@ducks.org
@DUSouthernNews
]]>
2013-01-17T12:41:56+00:00
<![CDATA[Waterfowl Gear Blast: Banded Cross Cut Layout Blind]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/waterfowl_gear_blast_banded_cross_cut_layout_blind http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/waterfowl_gear_blast_banded_cross_cut_layout_blind#When:12:07:55Z
COLUMBUS, Georgia- The Cross Cut Layout Blind by Banded was born from the desire to create the perfect layout blind. Available in Realtree MAX-4 ®, The Cross Cut Layout Blind is highly functional, performs in all conditions, provides optimal concealment and makes the days afield more enjoyable. The Cross Cut is designed to be the toughest and most durable layout blind available. Constructed with a heavy duty square-tubed steel frame, this layout blind is built to withstand the rigors of the outdoors and hunter. The Cross Cut's exterior is fabricated with a heavy-duty 900D cover and 1200D reinforced floor to block out the elements.

A padded head and back rest provide extra comfort. The "cockpit" features an extra wide opening for peak mobility along with a roomy interior. For optimal concealment, the Cross Cut's design incorporates an attached tapering skirt with concealment straps to virtually eliminate shadows. In addition, the integrated concealment straps, zippered flagging doors, mesh viewing windows and a folding design makes the blind easy to haul and stow. If durability and functionality are a necessity, the "Cross Cut" Layout Blind is a perfect choice.

Features:
  • The toughest, most durable layout blind available
  • Heavy duty square tubed steel frame system
  • Unfolded dimensions: 78" long, 36" wide, 14" rear height, 12" front height
  • Folded dimensions: 48" long, 36" wide, 8" height
  • Attached tapering skirt with concealment straps eliminates shadows
  • 28" wide cockpit
  • 900D cover
  • 1200D reinforced floor
  • Padded head and back rest
  • Zippered flag doors for easy flagging
  • Zippered boot bag for easy cleaning
  • Concealment straps for adding natural camouflage
  • Mesh viewing windows
  • Available in Realtree Max-4

www.banded.com ]]>
2013-01-15T12:07:55+00:00
<![CDATA[2013 Colorado Waterfowl Stamp Art Contest]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/2013_colorado_waterfowl_stamp_art_contest http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/2013_colorado_waterfowl_stamp_art_contest#When:11:11:32Z
DENVER - Colorado Parks and Wildlife is soliciting original artwork entries for the 2013 Colorado Waterfowl Stamp Art Contest. This year's species of focus is the Greater Scaup (Aythya marila). The deadline for artists to submit entries is 4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 1.

"We have a relatively large format entry for waterfowl stamps art and that really lets artists be creative with their depiction of the birds we choose each year," said Brian Sullivan, wetlands program coordinator and organizer of the waterfowl stamp program for Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

The Colorado Waterfowl Stamp program was implemented in 1990 and provides funding to conserve wetlands for waterfowl and other wetland-dependent wildlife. Waterfowl hunters 16 years of age and older are required by state law to purchase a waterfowl stamp validation annually before hunting. In addition to hunters, many collectors aid in wetland conservation by purchasing collector stamps and prints that are created from the winning entry.

The Greater Scaup has never been depicted on the Colorado waterfowl stamp. This bird is a medium-sized diving duck that closely resembles, and often mingles with the more common Lesser Scaup. Greater Scaup breed primarily in the boreal forest and tundra of Alaska and Canada, and winter along the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts. Small numbers migrate through Colorado. The Greater Scaup can be distinguished from the Lesser Scaup by its larger size, white coloration extending further into the primary wing feathers, and rounder head with a green sheen instead of purple. Both species are commonly referred to as "bluebills."

Artists must submit a 13-inch high by-18 inch wide, full color original artwork for the contest. There is a $50 fee for each entry. The winning entry will receive $3,500 with smaller cash prizes for second and third place as well. Complete requirements are explained in the application packet, which is available at http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/Waterfowl/WaterfowlStampProgram/.

Hunters can purchase the required $5.00 waterfowl stamp validation where hunting licenses are sold. The gum-backed stamp is available for a small additional fee.

Collector gum-backed stamps and art prints of the 2013 waterfowl stamp will be available for purchase midyear. Collector stamps and prints are sold through the Colorado Wildlife Heritage Foundation. The Colorado Wildlife Heritage Foundation also has past stamp winner prints available.

The Colorado Wildlife Heritage Foundation was created in 1989 as a result of Governor Roy Romer's Wildlife 21 Task Force report. The report recognized that Colorado's abundant and diverse wildlife makes an immense contribution to the state's economy and the quality of life in the state. The report also found that declining hunting and fishing revenues were insufficient to protect wildlife habitat from the threats posed by development. The Foundation was formed to raise funds to help fill the gap between available hunting and fishing funds and wildlife needs. The Foundation focuses its efforts on habitat preservation, wildlife research, species recovery, responding to wildlife emergencies and educating people about wildlife. For more information on the Colorado Wildlife Heritage Foundation, go to: www.cwhf.us .

Colorado Parks and Wildlife was created by the merger of Colorado State Parks and the Colorado Division of Wildlife, two nationally recognized leaders in conservation, outdoor recreation and wildlife management. Colorado Parks and Wildlife manages 42 state parks, all of Colorado's wildlife, more than 300 state wildlife areas and a host of recreational programs. For more information, visit cpw.state.co.us.
###

For more news about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us/NewsMedia/PressReleases

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.
Contact:
Jennifer Churchill 303-291-7234
]]>
2013-01-07T11:11:32+00:00
<![CDATA[Special Washington State Brant Hunt]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/special_washington_state_brant_hunt http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/special_washington_state_brant_hunt#When:12:55:10Z OLYMPIA - Brant goose numbers in Skagit County are high enough to allow an eight-day hunt later this month, according to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Brant hunting in Skagit County is scheduled Jan. 12, 13, 16, 19, 20, 23, 26, and 27 with a bag limit of two geese per day.

The hunting season was adopted by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission in August, contingent on a count of at least 6,000 brant in Skagit County. A total of 8,960 brant were counted Jan. 2 during an aerial survey of Fidalgo, Padilla and Samish bays.

"Numbers of brant wintering in Skagit County are up from last year's count of 6,704," said Don Kraege, waterfowl section manager for WDFW. "The brant season is structured to maintain the limited wintering population of western High Arctic birds (commonly known as gray-bellied brant) wintering in Skagit County."

This year's count in Skagit County is similar to the 10-year average, Kraege said. He noted that ground surveys conducted last winter indicated good productivity of brant, so this year's increase was not a surprise. About two thousand brant were counted in Whatcom County during this year's aerial survey.

To participate in the Skagit County brant season, hunters must purchase a special migratory bird hunting authorization and a harvest record card available from WDFW license dealers. After taking a brant, hunters are required to record their harvest information immediately on the card, and report their harvest to WDFW by Feb. 15. Hunters are reminded that failure to report by Feb. 15 will result in a $10 administrative fee added to cost of their 2013 license.

Hunters who harvest a brant fitted with a metal and/or colored leg band are asked to report the leg band information by calling 1-800-327-BAND or at http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbl/bblretrv/. The leg bands help biologists identify and track the birds.

More information on brant-hunting requirements is available in WDFW's Migratory Waterfowl and Upland Game Seasonshunting pamphlet, available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/.
Contact:
Don Kraege, (360) 902-2522
]]>
2013-01-04T12:55:10+00:00
<![CDATA[Yamaha Outdoors: Haul Waterfowl Gear In and Out]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/yamaha_outdoors_haul_waterfowl_gear_in_and_out http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/yamaha_outdoors_haul_waterfowl_gear_in_and_out#When:12:19:40Z
Haul waterfowl gear in and out of your hunting location on four reliable wheels.

Want to get your waterfowl gear from one access location to another where you'll hunt? There are few better ways than using your Yamaha ATV or Side-by-Side to do it.

Use Decoy Bags

In the good old days before the advent of sturdy, pocketed decoy bags we stashed rigs in the back of the truck and left it at that. Nowadays slotted pockets protect your decoy investment's painted finish. They fit easily in the back of a four wheeler. Styles vary and include 4-slot, 6-slot, 12-slot sizes for both ducks and geese. One-slot bags are available to protect expensive full-bodied decoys. Some float (good for timber sets), while others hold silhouette dekes firmly for easy carry. Inexpensive mesh decoy bags are useful too, though not as durable as heavy-duty slotted bags.

All fit on the back of your Yamaha wheels for setting pre-dawn spreads.

Use Blind Bags

Now that you've contained your decoy investment in portable bags, you'll need to stash your shells, calls, and other smaller items for the run to where you'll hunt. Blind bags often have dozens of zippered pockets, water-resistant elements, and so forth.

Check out more tips from Yamaha Outdoors.
 

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2012-12-04T12:19:40+00:00
<![CDATA[North Mississippi WMA Waterfowl Field Report]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/north_mississippi_wma_waterfowl_field_report http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/north_mississippi_wma_waterfowl_field_report#When:12:27:07Z
JACKSON, MS November 27, 2012 - Mississippi Department of Wildlife Fisheries and Parks personnel have worked diligently through the summer to manage waterfowl habitat on its Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in North Mississippi. Managed moist-soil vegetation and supplemental plantings of millet and milo should provide wintering waterfowl with abundant food resources in impoundments at Tuscumbia, Canal Section, Sardis Waterfowl, and the Graham Lake portion of Upper Sardis WMA. Additionally, recent removal of woody vegetation within some impoundments at Tuscumbia has improved waterfowl habitat on this WMA. According to WMA biologists, there is a moderate acorn crop within the green tree reservoir at John Bell Williams WMA, and depending upon water levels, will provide an abundance of food for waterfowl.

Most hunters have observed that the region is experiencing both a lack of substantial rainfall and mild temperatures. As a result, water levels continue to decrease in natural wetland areas and impoundments that depend entirely on rainfall. WMA personnel are pumping within designated impoundments at Tuscumbia and Canal Section WMA. Despite these pumping efforts, some areas may not have sufficient water for ducks or hunters by opening day. If dry conditions persist, fewer flooded areas will be available, but this reduced habitat availability may concentrate waterfowl and may improve hunter success.

For more information regarding Wildlife Management Areas in Mississippi, visit our website at www.mdwfp.com/wma or call us at 601-432-2199. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mdwfp or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MDWFPonline. ]]>
2012-11-28T12:27:07+00:00
<![CDATA[Delta Waterfowl’s President Steps Down]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/delta_waterfowls_president_steps_down http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/delta_waterfowls_president_steps_down#When:10:40:54Z
Bismarck, N.D. - After 20 years with Delta Waterfowl, Rob Olson announced today he is stepping down as president of the conservation organization. Olson's passion for waterfowling and his innovative vision for conservation has been a pillar of Delta's unprecedented growth over the past two decades. Olson will continue at Delta for the next several months to assist in the transition period.

Olson joined Delta in 1992 as a graduate student doing his master's degree work in natural resources management. Olson has held a variety of roles with the foundation. He was appointed president in 2003.

"It's been an absolutely incredible run for me at Delta," Olson said. "I'm honored to have been able to play a role in the success of one of North America's most innovative conservation organizations."

Olson was instrumental in growing the chapter volunteer network and support base for the organization, launching the first continent-wide duck hunter recruitment program, developing Delta's predator management program, leading Delta's cutting-edge communications work and overseeing the growth of the Alternative Land Use Services conservation program in Canada.

Olson said he is looking forward to spending more time with his family and friends in his hometown of Winnipeg, and will continue to support Delta in the future.

The organization's board of directors has named Dr. Frank Rohwer, Delta's long-time scientific director, as interim president.

Rohwer started working at Delta as a student assistant in 1976, and continued as a funded Delta graduate student for both his master's degree and doctorate work. After a short hiatus in the late 1980s, Rohwer returned to Delta as the scientific director in 1991. He has held that position for most of the years since then, while simultaneously serving on the faculty at Louisiana State University.

Delta is also pleased to announce the return of Jonathan Scarth, a past president who will lead Delta's efforts on conservation policy. Scarth has a long association with Delta, including a summer assistantship helping Rohwer track down radio-marked blue-winged teal broods in 1979.

Scarth is one of the architects of ALUS - Alternative Land Use Services - Delta's innovative program to foster duck and ecosystem-friendly farm policies. Scarth returns to Delta after a substantial stint in Canadian politics, which will be valuable background for the leader of Delta's programs to advance conservation policy that benefits ducks and duck hunters.

"These are exciting times," Rohwer said. "I'm confident Delta will become even more effective as a science-based advocacy organization. We are in this for the ducks, the hunters, the habitat and the waterfowl heritage that we love."

Delta Waterfowl Foundation is a leading North American conservation organization, tracing its origins to the birth of the wildlife conservation movement in 1911. The Foundation supports research, provides leadership and offers science-based solutions to efficiently conserve waterfowl and secure the future of waterfowl hunting. Delta Waterfowl is based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Bismarck, N.D.
Contact:
Nigel Simms
Vice President, Communications
Delta Waterfowl Foundation
nsimms@deltawaterfowl.org
O: 877.667.5656
C: 204.294.0374
]]>
2012-11-08T10:40:54+00:00
<![CDATA[Yamaha Outdoors: Show Waterfowl Where to Go]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/yamaha_outdoors_show_waterfowl_where_to_go http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/yamaha_outdoors_show_waterfowl_where_to_go#When:13:18:14Z
Show waterfowl where you want them to commit. Hide nearby (in shooting range of the fakes), and wait silently or call to enhance the appeal of that location. It's all good. (Steve Hickoff photo)

Food matters when you want to pull sky-bound ducks and geese into your spot. The spread you set is obviously defined by the calculated way you place your decoys in front of your gunning position. Most of all, it's crucial to making that location all it can be.

The key: set it up so that incoming waterfowl can pick an open spot to try and land where they already want to be -- or where they realized they want to be on seeing your fake birds out there, enhanced by calling. Shoot them as they cup and commit.

Place that open spot so that it's in a shooting lane you desire. Then wait, calls ready if needed.

Rough It Up: Ducks and geese don't envision the pretty geometric spreads you do the night before while tossing and turning in a camp bunk. Sometimes you'll need to set up ragged spreads to represent geese and ducks that have landed and are feeding comfortably -- even though tight spreads might also suggest a concentrated food source. Know the difference.

How Birds Move: What's the flight path of your local waterfowl? Study it on your four Yamaha wheels. The spot you pick to hunt has to be in the reliable path of geese and ducks that move from where they loaf at night to where they might feed in the morning. Places like pastures and even marshes qualify here. Zero-grade rice fields and possibly unfrozen river systems do too.

Learn the Alphabet: Terrain and traditional approach depending, some guys prefer a "C" spread of decoys, with the geese and ducks encouraged to land in the open area. For others, an "X" works, and gunners hide at the center of the set. Still others employ a "V" shape for their decoys, pointing that into the wind (weather depending). Others prefer the fishhook "J" way of putting out fakes. Tweak it as you hunt, especially as the breeze shifts.

For more tips go to Yamaha Outdoors.

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2012-11-06T13:18:14+00:00
<![CDATA[Gear Blast: Banded RedZone Breathable Waders]]> http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/gear_blast_banded_redzone_breathable_waders http://www.liveforhunting.com/index.php/site/gear_blast_banded_redzone_breathable_waders#When:10:20:07Z
COLUMBUS, Georgia-- Banded's new RedZone Breathable Waders, available in Realtree MAX-4 ® and Realtree AP ™, are the culmination of the mission to develop the most comfortable, lightest, most practical, bad-to-the-bone breathable waders ever made. After countless hours of research and development and extensive materials testing, Banded engineers fused optimal fabrics with the most scientifically advanced waterproof and breathable laminate to develop the Super Hydrophobic Evaporative Development System™ (SHEDS™). Designers then unified anatomical research and insulation components to create a cutting-edge Heat Absorbing Retention System™, otherwise known as HARS™ (only available in Insulated models). The next step was to incorporate the cutting-edge SHEDS™ and HARS™ technology into an ultimate breathable wader featuring unprecedented functionality, wear-ability, durability and performance throughout all the extreme conditions the waterfowler commonly encounters.

Taped seams provide 100% waterproofness, and the reinforced knees and seat areas with 900D fabric provide ultimate strength. Designers also integrated a Thinsulate™ insulated boot, articulated key areas for maximum range of motion and incorporated the first ever bib-fit styling. The end result is the most technologically advanced, sharpest-looking, new-aged breathable wader ever to hit the market. Whether you find yourself walking long distances to your "spot" or simply hopping into the blind, you'll find that the RedZone wader is extremely versatile for all seasons and conditions.

Unisulated Features
SHEDS™ waterproof breathable technology
100% waterproof fully taped seams
1000 gram Thinsulate™ insulated boot
900D reinforced knee and seat for maximum durability
Articulated knee design for maximum range of motion
Side zip chest adjustment
Bib-fit styling
Integrated over the boot gaiter
Removable webbing belt
Upper chest shell sleeves
Fleece lined hand warmer chest pocket
Water resistant chest pouch
Adjustable shoulder suspenders
High back panel for exposure protection
Comfort rating 32 F to 70 F degrees

MSRP: $299.99

Insulated Features
HARS™ insulation technology
SHEDS™ waterproof breathable technology
100% waterproof fully taped seams
1200 gram Thinsulate™ insulated boot
900D reinforced knee and seat for maximum durability
Side zip chest adjustment
Bib-fit styling
Integrated over the boot gaiter
Removable webbing belt
Upper chest shell sleeves
Fleece lined hand warmer chest pocket
Water resistant chest pouch
Articulated knee design for maximum range of motion
Adjustable shoulder suspenders
High back panel for exposure protection
Comfort rating -10 F to 50 F degrees
MSRP: $349.99

www.banded.com ]]>
2012-10-31T10:20:07+00:00